Singalong: Sea Level Festival Showcases First Families of Tune

Is musical talent hereditary?

The Sea Level Singer/Songwriter Festival this year is proof — proof, I tell you – there is a music gene somewhere in the recesses of our DNA. Consider the evidence for yourself when the first families of music in the area perform over two nights to benefit the Tidewater Arts Outreach.

TAO is evidence of the healing powers of music, probably something also deep in those ancestral strands. The nonprofit arranges for local artists to perform at assisted living facilities, skilled nursing facilities, residential programs, homeless shelters and other organizations – more than 250 artists for more than 5,000 people in 2015.

Those performances are a balm to residents. Research increasingly shows the benefits to mental as well as physical health for those sitting and listening or clapping and singing along.

It Runs in the Family starts with a free show at Norfolk’s O’Connor Brewing Company at 5 p.m. on Friday, March 31. Skye Zentz and her father, folk legend, Bob Zentz and his wife, Jeanne McDougall, join Zach and Megan Moats of Dharma Initiative and their father, Roy.

On Saturday, hear how far afield that gene ranges, from the blues to folk to bluegrass, at The Attucks Theatre. Show time is 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20 in advance (it’s $4.50 more with Ticketmaster fees online) and $28.50 at the door.

The Saturday lineup is:

Bill and Pam Gurley with daughter, Macon, and guest bassist Jimmy Masters.

Bobby and Joy “Blackhat” Walters with their children, Akeylah, Maya, Shayna and possibly Ellie with special guest guitarist Tom Euler.

Lewis McGehee with his daughter, Kayce

Keith Stainback with his son, Seth, joined by Larry Berwald and Stephen Lazar.

I asked them four questions about their first performance together, about their favorite song written by the other, about their memories of singing together for the first time and a song the other likes they don’t need to ever hear again.



   Skye Zentz says she doesn’t recall the first song she heard her father, a longtime legendary folk singer, but there was a constant stream of sounds and songs from her earliest days. “There’s a very early memory I have of my Dad carrying me around on his shoulders singing the Woody Woodpecker theme song,” she says. She has old cassettes of the two of them on the front porch, singing together, making up lyrics when she was a four-year-old while he played the accordion. “Those early tapes taught me a lot about being a mindful accompanist,” she says. “It takes a lot of attention and rhythm to back up a spontaneous toddler.”

She is fond of her dad’s “He Was Just Some Old Jukebox.” “He wrote those words about Ramblin’ Conrad, but they also remind me of my Dad, himself- he knows so many songs,” she adds. She does not admit to disliking any of his tunes, but jokes that the drone from him tuning his hurdy gurdy haunts her in her sleep.


On Saturday, the Bobby “Blackhat” Walters clan takes the stage at the Attucks. The first performance by the kids, then ages 7 to 13, came at a school talent show when they sang “Lean on Me” acapella, creating rhythms with hand clapping, knee slapping and stomping. As kids they sang and acted out musicals including Disney’s “The Jungle Book,” “Beauty and the Beast,” “Pocahontas,” “Aladdin”, and the High School Musicals. The family sang together from the time the kids were babies and then at religious ceremonies. The children have played various musical instruments including piano, guitar, drums, bass, ukulele, saxophone, bongos, clarinet, flute, mandolin, recorder, and violin.  Bobby is the only harp player.

The kids remember mom singing “All Night All Day” at bedtime and dad singing “Let My People Go” at the top of his lungs “for god knows why.”

Ellie also remembers her dad’s worst moment. “Most annoying song is “Too Legit To Quit” by MC Hammer,” Ellie says. “The only time I think I was embarrassed by my dad was him singing that dang song in his parachute pants walking through the mall torturing me at 15.”

On the flip side, “Help Me” is her favorite song sung by Bobby. “I got to see that wonderful in love look between my parents that I saw since I was a kid. That flirty big eye attitude lovey look that my mom has only for my daddy when he would sing it on stage,” she says.

For Maya, it’s “Honey Biscuit,” “the sweetest, most precious love song ever written (by my dad).”


Kayce McGehee, who performs under the name Kayce Laine, now lives in Nashville, where she is building a solo career playing indie electro pop music.  Her father is one of the deans of local acoustic players.

She remembers her father recording “Distant Voices” just after she was born in 1988. “A lot of the tracking was done at our home studio so some of my earliest memories of life are of him singing and playing those songs. “Looking at the Headlights,” “Walking Away”….all of the songs on that record bring me back,” she says. He remembers her singing Disney tunes and realizing she had talent.

Let Kayce explain the favorite that her father penned: “I would probably have to say “Growing of Grass” for a number of reasons: 1. I think the song itself is brilliant from the lyrics to the chord changes 2. It’s a song that I have performed with him and also covered of his for over a decade now 3. All of my sisters have, at one point, wanted to get the lyrics tattooed on our bodies (none of us have actually done this…yet!) and 4. We just got done recording it in Nashville a few weeks ago and will finally have an incredible version to share with everyone in just a few more weeks.”


   For Lewis, his favorite Kayce song is “5 AM Light,” a synth-heavy electronic pop song from her debut EP, “Lucid.” “I think it showcases her multiple talents of songwriting, singing, piano playing and production,” he says.

Their first public performance together, Kayce says, was when she was still a child. “The first gig we did together was me singing an Alabama song, “Angels Among Us,” with him for some sort of convention or fundraiser when I was 7 or 8. For whatever reason, I didn’t like the spotlight when I was young so I usually got ice cream or some sort of treat for getting up and singing with him. Now I ask for money :),” she recalls.

Lewis remembers that day. “Kayce was singing it around the house and I thought “She sounds waaay better than me doing this” so I drafted her to join me.”

There is one song her father favors that Kayce has heard enough. “Dad has taught every single guitar student “Good Riddance” by Green Day since it came out in 1997 so I’ve probably heard him play and sing that song thousands of times,” she says. “Now, I definitely wouldn’t say that he loves this song, but he loves TEACHING this song and I can safely say, I would be totally fine if I never heard it again.”


Keith Stainback, the father of blues rocker Seth Stainback of Roosterfoot, remembers his son singing around the house and at church from the time he was a toddler. But one day stands out. “I don’t remember the first song I heard Seth sing, there were so many. He would sing around the house from the time was a toddler. Mostly songs from church, or songs he’d hear his mom sing,” he says. “I do remember one day I was sitting on the deck when we lived in South Carolina. Seth was around 16 years old. He walked up with his guitar and said he had just finished writing a song and would I like to hear it. Now I knew that he could sing and was already a good guitarist, but after he played me the new song, I realized he also had a gift for songwriting.”

His favorite is “Earth & Worm,” the title cut off the band’s full-length album. “I’ve always loved “Earth & Worm.” It’s a great song and it’s about family,” he adds. “Now, the song “Reckless” off the new Roosterfoot EP gives me goosebumps every time I hear it. Again, there are so many good ones, it’s hard to choose a favorite.”

They started playing together down below and eventually made it to higher ground. “Seth and I spent many, many hours jamming in the basement at home,” Keith says. “I’m pretty sure the first time we played in public together would have been with the band at church. We played a show together at his high school, which would have also been one of the first public times.”

While their tastes are the same, Keith admits that those prog rock days are probably not his son’s favorite.

“Seth probably has a few songs he doesn’t want to hear again. Songs that I would get him listen to when he was younger. Mostly progressive rock from bands like Yes, early Genesis, stuff like that. Even though recently he has shown an interest in experimenting with time signatures other than basic 4/4 and 6/8. I like to think that old stuff I made him listen to just might be coming out,” Keith says. “We will see.”

 

 

–end—-

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